The Play That Goes Wrong

The Olivier Award Winning
Hilarious
Physical
Comedy
Murder Mystery !


The Funniest Disaster
You’ve Ever Seen

Welcome to opening night of The Murder at Haversham Manor where things are quickly going from bad to utterly disastrous. With an unconscious leading lady, a corpse that can’t play dead, and actors who trip over everything (including their lines), come see why Ben Brantley of The New York Times calls The Play That Goes Wrong “A gut-busting hit!”

This Olivier Award-winning comedy is a hilarious hybrid of Monty Python and Sherlock Holmes. It’s “a riotous explosion of comedy!” (The Daily Beast) and “tons of fun for all ages!” (HuffPost). Cindy Adams of the New York Post has just one word for you: “Go!” Get tickets now – it would be WRONG to wait!


Comedic Stage Craft
to Delight Your Students

This hilarious production features an extraordinary range of theatrical techniques that are sure to energize your group’s studies. Showcasing the fundamentals of comedy, the truly original premise promises to inspire performers and playwrights of the future.

You all know the classic whodunnit story, there has been a murder at a country manor and an inspector is set on the case to find who the culprit is. However, when this plot is given to the accident-prone thespians, The Cornley Drama Society, everything that can go wrong… does! The actors and crew battle against all odds to make it through to their final curtain call, with hilarious consequences! Do you ever find out who murdered Charles Haversham? You’ll have to see for yourself!


Teacher Reviews

A wonderfully goofy time with some serious laughs!

June 5, 2023

It shows the importance of safety in shows with heavy stage combat, set changes, or planned mistakes. Seems adaptable to high school or companies with less technical resources.

Greta

No Title

May 31, 2023

Seeing this play allows educators to look into intense stage combat and great set work. You can see how much work goes into making a set break apart every night and how important it is to stay in character.

Hailey

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